Septuagint

Greek: "seventy"

Oldest Greek translation of Hebrew scriptures (3rd-2nd c. BCE) that became the standard version used in Hellenistic synagogues & early churches. The name  -- regularly abbreviated as LXX -- was from the popular legend that this was the work of 70 (or 72) sages who translated the Jewish Bible for the Hellenistic Egyptian monarch, Ptolemy II Philadelphus. Since this translation was made centuries before the canon of the Hebrew Bible was set, it contained a number of Jewish works that were eventually excluded from the Hebrew Bible. Among these apocryphal ["hidden"] works are:

[Edition used: Rahlfs, Alfred, ed. Septuaginta. Stuttgart: Deutsche Biblestiftung, 1935].

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